Sex: Let’s Toke About It

By Amber Faust, WikiLeaf.com

Marijuana has been used as an aphrodisiac for thousands of years.

Ancient texts outline ways to utilize cannabis to enhance the sexual experience. It has been a part of some ancient Tantric sex rituals and even used in Ayurvedic and Unani Tibbi medicine to increase libido and cure impotence. Unfortunately, modern studies on weed and sex are rare and often inconclusive due to limitations in sample demographics, but if user accounts are any indication, it doesn’t appear cannabis has lost it’s touch!

It’s A Man’s Weed

In 1981, the University of Texas examined sexual activity and biochemistry in mice that had been given varying doses of THC. The interesting thing about this study is that it appeared to resolve the contradiction between user accounts of enhanced sexual experience and scientific findings that indicated a decrease in sex drive. This is because it was the first study to examine testosterone levels immediately after administering the THC rather than an hour or more later.

The results were surprising. Within minutes of receiving THC, the testosterone level of the mice jumped to six times the normal amount but the length of time this increase was maintained decreased the higher the dose of THC the mouse received. Those mice who received a higher dose of THC not only experienced a more rapid diminishment of this increased testosterone but saw these levels drop below normal after 20 minutes. The higher the high, the lower the low apparently.

This study was the first to understand why heavy cannabis users experienced lower testosterone levels in the long run but it was also the first to confirm anecdotal reports that cannabis enhanced the sexual experience as well. Conclusion? Strains with a lower THC level may be a better choice if you are concerned about long term testosterone production.

If you have concerns about future fertility, you may want to reduce the frequency of your smoking sessions as well

A 2015 study by Oxford University Press showed that males who smoked cannabis more than once a week has sperm counts that were reduced by almost a third in comparison to non-smokers. Although, it should be noted that researchers were hesitant to declare marijuana the sole cause of this reduction though since there may be other behavioral and lifestyle factors that they were unable to take into account.

However, despite the potential effects on long term testosterone Sex and cannabis production and sperm count, Dr. Lester Grinspoon , “the grandfather of modern medicinal cannabis research,” had this to say, “There’s no doubt that when people are high, they’re more sensitive to their sexual feelings and urges. Look, if you come to me and tell me that you’re having difficulty in getting turned on sexually, or that you’re experiencing premature ejaculation or erectile dysfunction, I might ask, ‘Have you ever tried marijuana before? It won’t hurt you. You might try it.’”

Like A Natural Woman

For women, on the other hand, cannabis is the female viagra, without all the unpleasant side pharmaceutical side effects or long term worries that guys may have about fertility! Women report enhanced sexual arousal and sensation, increased stamina, and longer lasting orgasm when utilizing marijuana. Marijuana may be particularly effective for women due to its effects on both the mind and the body. Female arousal is much more complex than a physical response and orgasm often depends on mental as well as physical stimulation. However, just like their male counterparts, less is more. According to most studies, optimal strains for sexual arousal contain approximately 14% THC as compared to the 15-20% typically preferred for recreational use.

This lower dose of THC is perfect for increasing physical sensitivity, reducing inhibitions, and providing a relaxed, in-the-moment mindset

Of course, because the vaginal area is so absorbent, the benefits aren’t limited to smoking or ingesting cannabis when it comes to sexual enhancement. While consuming the cannabis is ideal for altering the user’s mindset and helping to overcome mental impediments to achieving orgasm, topicals are the perfect solution for purely physical barriers. The University of British Columbia completed studies that show topicals infused with cannabis increase blood flow to the genitalia and produces increased response to stimulation. Amelia McDonnell-Parry of The Frisky, described her experience with cannabis infused lubricant as a high just for her vagina. Kind of gives a new definition to party in your pants, huh? But seriously, topicals can help overcome painful intercourse, vaginal dryness, or simply be used to amplify the sexual experience and increase pleasure.

Play It Safe Sex

Regardless of your gender, marijuana can help provide a more satisfying sexual experience but remember that every experience should be a safe experience.sex and cannabis Cannabis can lower your inhibitions and may make you want to rush past the protection portion of your evening, but don’t! It’s especially important if you and your partner are enjoying marijuana that you establish clear consent. When any form of intoxicating substances are involved, it is imperative that consent be explicit. You don’t want a great sexual experience to turn into a lifetime of regret, so play it safe and make sure you and your partner are clearly on the same page.

Last, but not least, remember that cannabis can affect each person differently and your experiences may vary depending on what strain you’re utilizing as well

Keep this in mind if you plan on utilizing cannabis as a means to spice up your sex life. In fact, there are many cannabis products available that are designed specifically for this purpose. Sexxpot is a low THC strain designed specifically for getting it on and cannabis infused products like those from Foria and Bliss are excellent topical applications that will add new levels of sensation to your sexual repertoire. So don’t be afraid to branch out and see what cannabis can do for your mojo!

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

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